Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

Sep 05, 2017

Post by Jason Papallo, NCCJ E-Communications and Marketing Specialist

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost 43,000 people die from suicide every year. That’s roughly 121 suicides a day. We want that number to drop to zero. That’s why we’re reminding you to pay extra attention to the feelings and behaviors of yourself and others.

Members of marginalized groups can be at higher risk of suicide, with the LGBTQ community’s suicide rates being three times higher than national averages. This is often related to heterocentric cultures and institutionalized homophobia, as cited by the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Studies also shows that those with autism spectrum disorders are 28 times more likely to attempt suicide over the general population. This is often due to the trauma that many with ASD go through due to social stigmas, resulting in physical and emotional abuse, and often times isolation.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness shows that reckless behavior, impulsive actions, frequent emotional highs and lows, social withdrawal, possession purging and uncharacteristic or out-of-place farewelling are all warning signs for someone at risk of committing suicide. If you believe that someone you know is suffering from mental health issues, NAMI suggests calling a mental health professional for advice.

The national suicide hotline is 1-800-273 TALK (8255), and NAMI offers texting by texting “NAMI” to 741-741 for those that are uncomfortable with talking on the phone. These crisis lines are staffed 24/7 and free for anyone to call, no matter what time or how severe the crisis. Learn more about suicide prevention here.

 


About the National Conference for Community and Justice

            Formed 1927, NCCJ is a nonprofit human relations organization that promotes inclusion and acceptance by providing education and advocacy while building communities that are respectful and just for all. Celebrating the diversity of races, religions, cultures, genders, abilities, and sexual orientations.

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